Added new noise paper
authorTrevor Irons <Trevor.Irons@lemmasoftware.org>
Sun, 14 May 2017 16:20:56 +0000 (10:20 -0600)
committerTrevor Irons <Trevor.Irons@lemmasoftware.org>
Sun, 14 May 2017 16:20:56 +0000 (10:20 -0600)
NMR_Noise/doc.tex [new file with mode: 0644]

diff --git a/NMR_Noise/doc.tex b/NMR_Noise/doc.tex
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..432ab53
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,95 @@
+%\setpapersize{A4}
+%\documentclass[extra,referee]{gji}
+\documentclass[extra]{gji}
+%\pdfminorversion=4
+\usepackage{blindtext}
+%\usepackage{natbib}
+
+%\usepackage{graphicx}
+%\usepackage{epstopdf}
+
+%\usepackage{timet}
+\usepackage[fleqn]{amsmath}
+\usepackage{amssymb}
+
+%\usepackage{algorithm}
+%\usepackage{algorithmic}
+%\usepackage{placeins}
+
+% allows use of Geophysics style plot commands and labeling.
+%\usepackage[endfloat]{seghack}
+%\graphicspath{{./Fig/}}
+
+
+\title[Estimating noise in gated NMR data]{Bootstrapping confidence intervals in time-gated nuclear magnetic resonance data}
+%\title[Estimating noise in gated NMR data]{Quantifying noise in time-gated nuclear magnetic resonance data}
+\author[T. Irons and M. A. Kass] %,  and J. McKenna]
+  {Trevor Irons$^{1}$, 
+   Brian J.O.L. McPherson$^{1}$, 
+   and M. Andy Kass$^{2}$  \\ 
+  $^1$ University of Utah 
+  $^2$ Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center, United States Geological Survey, Denver CO \emph{80225}, USA\\ 
+  }
+\date{Received 201X XXXX XX; in original form 2013 July 30}
+\pagerange{\pageref{firstpage}--\pageref{lastpage}}
+\volume{XX}
+\pubyear{XXXX}
+
+%\def\LaTeX{L\kern-.36em\raise.3ex\hbox{{\small A}}\kern-.15em
+%    T\kern-.1667em\lower.7ex\hbox{E}\kern-.125emX}
+%\def\LATeX{L\kern-.36em\raise.3ex\hbox{{\Large A}}\kern-.15em
+%    T\kern-.1667em\lower.7ex\hbox{E}\kern-.125emX}
+% Authors with AMS fonts and mssymb.tex can comment out the following
+% line to get the correct symbol for Geophysical Journal International.
+%\let\leqslant=\leq
+
+%\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}[section]
+
+\begin{document}
+
+\label{firstpage}
+
+\maketitle
+
+\begin{summary}
+Time gating is a commonly used approach in the preprocessing of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data before Laplace inversion. Gating suppresses spurious signals that can degrade recovered decay time distributions and therefore often stabilizes inversion. However, care must be taken in applying this technique to real world data where both non-Gaussian and correlated noise decrease the efficacy of noise reduction through stacking. If not properly accounted for, unreliable noise estimates introduce inversion artefacts. Fortunately, noise realization proxies obtained through data phasing can be used to bootstrap reliable confidence intervals for the windowed data. Benefits of the approach are demonstrated through inversion of synthetics as well as borehole and surface NMR data. 
+\end{summary}
+
+\section{Introduction}
+Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data provide a unique means by which to directly quantity important hydrological properties including porosity, permeability, and fluid-typing. Since the 1960's borehole NMR has been relied upon in the oil and gas industry where it has proven invaluable at fluid-typing and porosity and permeability quantification.  In many locations active nuclear sources (as required by neutron and $\gamma$-$\gamma$ tools) are not permitted in aquifers serving municipal or agricultural purposes. Miniaturized borehole probes can be used in harsh conditions using hand augured slim holes where drill rigs could not reach. Surface NMR measurements do not require a borehole and can probe depths of up to 100m non-invasively. For these reasons NMR has been enthusiastically adopted in the environmental and near surface hydrological community.  
+
+In geophysical applications NMR data are primarily collected, processed, and inverted in the time domain; although notable exceptions do exist \cite[]{IronsLi2014,HeinEtAl2017}. For borehole data, the acquisition typically involves CPMG echo trains where each echo peak is retained to form the exponentially decaying signal of interest. The CPMG pulses are utilized to refocus the spins which quickly dephase due to magnetic field inhomogeneity imposed by the high field permanent magnet used for $\mathbf{B}_0$. For surface NMR, the earth's field is utilized for $\mathbf{B}_0$ which is much more uniform. Although CPMG pulses can be collected with surface NMR instruments, in most cases the physical limitations of such measurements means that free induction decay measurements are most commonly relied upon. These data oscillate at the Larmor frequency which is generally removed using a form of quadrature detection scheme. 
+As a result these two dataforms are often processed using the same techniques and approaches, although we will show the noise characteristics of the two are quite different.  
+
+\section{Time gating}
+Time gating is an effective means by which to accelerate and stabilize the inversion of NMR data. Due to the exponential nature of the imaging kernel, the NMR sensitivity to discrimination of slowly decaying signals is very low. This is confounded by the low SNR of late time data. In terms of application time gating represents the application of a low pass filter and subsequent decimation over the time signal. A simple moving average filter--however--can not be applied as picking the appropriate length   
+
+\begin{equation}
+       V_N[i] =  \sum v
+\end{equation}
+
+Since late time signals can be very low and small water contents with long decay times give minimal measure in an $L^2$ sense
+It is not uncommon for first pass inversions to show unreasonable water contents if inappropriate regularisation is applied.  
+
+[INSERT synthetic example of additive gaussian noise data and time gated signal with errorbars assuming ideal stacking
+and (b) inversion of data using dense, gated, and gated with variance stacking
+]
+
+\section{Borehole measurements}
+If the above approach is applied to borehole data we see some clear issues. The late time data are not decreasing in noise as expected. 
+
+\subsection{burst-mode}
+Stacking efficiency 
+
+\section{Surface measurements}
+
+hi here is some stuff 
+\cite{Weichman2000}
+
+\blindtext
+
+\bibliographystyle{gji}
+\bibliography{nmr}
+\label{lastpage}
+
+\end{document}