EAGE changes
authorAndy Kass <kass.andrew@gmail.com>
Sat, 15 Apr 2017 15:15:17 +0000 (09:15 -0600)
committerAndy Kass <kass.andrew@gmail.com>
Sat, 15 Apr 2017 15:15:17 +0000 (09:15 -0600)
EAGE_Abstract/NMR_EAGE.tex

index 93395d2..3f4aa3b 100755 (executable)
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (sNMR) provides direct, non-invasive estimate
 Most commonly in field surveys, the inductive transmitter and receiver pair are coincident.  While this has several advantages in terms of field deployment and signal interpretation, there are many alternative advantages to a compact, multi-turn receiver, for example as described by \cite{Behroozmand2016}.  We extend this idea to a roving, multicomponent receiver, of the same general concept as many three-component transient electromagnetic (TEM) receivers, similar to the concept of \cite{DavisEtAl2014} though here using inductive receivers.  This configuration provides distinct advantages over coincident loop receivers, including: increased signal to noise, improved resolution, the ability to target specific areas of the subsurface,  reduced dead time, and additional digital noise reduction procedures available.  Here, we provide motivation for the approach through the simulation of three-component receivers in a central loop sounding configuration and generation of both 1D and 3D kernels.  Associated field work and follow up analysis will include multiple positions relative to the transmitter loop to demonstrate the increased resolving power and signal to noise available through this technique.
 
 \section{Theory}
-We consider the standard on-resonance pulses and subsequent free induction decay in this paper; however our results can be extended to other pulse sequences as the loop and spin coupling will be the same. For an inductive coil sensor $i$, the sNMR measurement results in the observation of an induced voltage $\left( \mathcal{V}_N^{(i)} \right)$ which is a function of pulse moment $q= I_p \tau_p$; where $I_p$ is the tipping pulse peak current and $\tau_p$ is the duration of the pulse. The measured voltage can be formulated in terms of an imaging kernel $\left( \mathcal{K}_0^{(i)} \right)$ which is sensitive to the NMR-detectable water model $\left(f_p\right)$ fractionated into decay bins \cite[]{Weichman2000,Hertrich2005,Mueller-Petke2010}
+We consider the standard on-resonance pulses and subsequent free induction decay in this paper; however our results can be extended to other pulse sequences as the loop and spin coupling will be the same. For an inductive coil sensor $i$, the sNMR measurement results in the observation of an induced voltage $\left( \mathcal{V}_N^{(i)} \right)$ which is a function of pulse moment $q= I_p \tau_p$, where $I_p$ is the tipping pulse peak current and $\tau_p$ is the duration of the pulse. The measured voltage can be formulated in terms of an imaging kernel $\left( \mathcal{K}_0^{(i)} \right)$ which is sensitive to the NMR-detectable water model $\left(f_p\right)$ fractionated into decay bins \cite[]{Weichman2000,Hertrich2005,Mueller-Petke2010}
 \begin{align}
        \overline{\mathcal{V}}_N^{(i)}(q,t)  
     =  &\int_V \overline{\mathcal{K}}_0^{(i)} \left(\mathbf{r}, q, \boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}}_T, \boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}}_R^{(i)}\right) \, \int f_p(\mathbf{r}, T_2^{*}) 
@@ -84,7 +84,7 @@ Figure \ref{fig:Kerns} shows the simulated imaging kernels comparing a compact,
 Decoupling the transmitter and receiver also allows the receiver to move freely with respect to the trasmitter loop.  Figure \ref{fig:RxSens} shows the lateral variation in the imaging kernel in the $x$ component for a single pulse moment, demonstrating the spatial sensitivity to a moving receiver.
 
 \section{Conclusions}
-We have shown that a three-component compact receiver can improve depth sensitivity in surface nuclear magnetic resonance when used in a centre-loop sounding configuration.  Allowing the receiver to be decoupled from the transmitter loop permits movement of the coil to spatially sample the survey area--this is the first step in generating a three-dimensional NMR imaging kernel for a well-posed numerical inversion.  Finally, aligning a component with the background field may prove to be a useful noise cancelling tool in certain environments.
+We have shown that a three-component compact receiver can improve depth sensitivity in surface nuclear magnetic resonance when used in a centre-loop sounding configuration.  Allowing the receiver to be decoupled from the transmitter loop permits movement of the coil to spatially sample the survey area--this is the first step in generating a three-dimensional NMR imaging kernel for a well-posed numerical inversion.  Additionally, aligning a component with the background field may prove to be a useful noise cancelling tool in certain environments.
  
 
 %\section{Acknowledgements}