Updated figures and bib
authorT-bone <trevorirons@gmail.com>
Sun, 16 Apr 2017 04:57:08 +0000 (04:57 +0000)
committerT-bone <trevorirons@gmail.com>
Sun, 16 Apr 2017 04:57:08 +0000 (04:57 +0000)
EAGE_Abstract/Lemma/CLS-grid/Kern.yaml
EAGE_Abstract/Lemma/CLS-grid/run.sh
EAGE_Abstract/Lemma/CLS-grid/xi3d.pdf
EAGE_Abstract/Lemma/CLS-grid/xr3d.pdf
EAGE_Abstract/NMR_EAGE.tex

index 93b9e09..60ae42f 100644 (file)
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ IntegrationOrigin: !<Vector3r>
     - .5
 Larmor: 0
 Temperature: 283
-tol: 1e-11
+tol: 1e-13
 minLevel: 0
 maxLevel: 12
 Taup: 0.02
index 69753ea..009a6d9 100755 (executable)
@@ -2,6 +2,6 @@
 # Central loop sounding
 #./KernelV0-2 Kern.yaml  100m  z-comp 
 #./KernelV0-2 Kern.yaml  100m  y-comp 
-./KernelV0-2 Kern.yaml  100m  x-comp 
+./KernelV0-2 Kern.yaml  100m  x-comp true 
 
 # post-processing
index 4d26e97..347c816 100644 (file)
Binary files a/EAGE_Abstract/Lemma/CLS-grid/xi3d.pdf and b/EAGE_Abstract/Lemma/CLS-grid/xi3d.pdf differ
index 003a94a..764cfc8 100644 (file)
Binary files a/EAGE_Abstract/Lemma/CLS-grid/xr3d.pdf and b/EAGE_Abstract/Lemma/CLS-grid/xr3d.pdf differ
index 3f4aa3b..af08151 100755 (executable)
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (sNMR) provides direct, non-invasive estimate
 Most commonly in field surveys, the inductive transmitter and receiver pair are coincident.  While this has several advantages in terms of field deployment and signal interpretation, there are many alternative advantages to a compact, multi-turn receiver, for example as described by \cite{Behroozmand2016}.  We extend this idea to a roving, multicomponent receiver, of the same general concept as many three-component transient electromagnetic (TEM) receivers, similar to the concept of \cite{DavisEtAl2014} though here using inductive receivers.  This configuration provides distinct advantages over coincident loop receivers, including: increased signal to noise, improved resolution, the ability to target specific areas of the subsurface,  reduced dead time, and additional digital noise reduction procedures available.  Here, we provide motivation for the approach through the simulation of three-component receivers in a central loop sounding configuration and generation of both 1D and 3D kernels.  Associated field work and follow up analysis will include multiple positions relative to the transmitter loop to demonstrate the increased resolving power and signal to noise available through this technique.
 
 \section{Theory}
-We consider the standard on-resonance pulses and subsequent free induction decay in this paper; however our results can be extended to other pulse sequences as the loop and spin coupling will be the same. For an inductive coil sensor $i$, the sNMR measurement results in the observation of an induced voltage $\left( \mathcal{V}_N^{(i)} \right)$ which is a function of pulse moment $q= I_p \tau_p$, where $I_p$ is the tipping pulse peak current and $\tau_p$ is the duration of the pulse. The measured voltage can be formulated in terms of an imaging kernel $\left( \mathcal{K}_0^{(i)} \right)$ which is sensitive to the NMR-detectable water model $\left(f_p\right)$ fractionated into decay bins \cite[]{Weichman2000,Hertrich2005,Mueller-Petke2010}
+We consider the standard on-resonance pulses and subsequent free induction decay in this paper; however our results can be extended to other pulse sequences as the loop and spin coupling will be the same. For an inductive coil sensor $i$, the sNMR measurement results in the observation of an induced voltage $\left( \mathcal{V}_N^{(i)} \right)$ which is a function of pulse moment $q= I_p \tau_p$, where $I_p$ is the tipping pulse peak current and $\tau_p$ is the duration of the pulse. The measured voltage can be formulated in terms of an imaging kernel $\left( \mathcal{K}_0^{(i)} \right)$ which is sensitive to the NMR-detectable water model $\left(f_p\right)$ fractionated into decay bins \cite[]{Weichman2000,Hertrich2005}
 \begin{align}
        \overline{\mathcal{V}}_N^{(i)}(q,t)  
     =  &\int_V \overline{\mathcal{K}}_0^{(i)} \left(\mathbf{r}, q, \boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}}_T, \boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}}_R^{(i)}\right) \, \int f_p(\mathbf{r}, T_2^{*}) 
@@ -68,8 +68,8 @@ We simulate the sNMR response for an earth with a conductivity structure as foll
 
 \begin{figure}
        \begin{tabular}{cc}
-       \includegraphics[width=.45\linewidth]{Lemma/CLS-grid/xi3d} & 
-       \includegraphics[width=.45\linewidth]{Lemma/CLS-grid/xr3d}   %\\
+       \includegraphics[width=.45\linewidth]{Lemma/CLS-grid/xr3d} &  %\\
+       \includegraphics[width=.45\linewidth]{Lemma/CLS-grid/xi3d}  
        %\includegraphics[width=.45\linewidth]{Lemma/CLS-grid/xi2d} & 
        %\includegraphics[width=.45\linewidth]{Lemma/CLS-grid/xr2d}
        \end{tabular}