EAGE abs for review
authorAndy Kass <kass.andrew@gmail.com>
Sat, 15 Apr 2017 15:03:12 +0000 (09:03 -0600)
committerAndy Kass <kass.andrew@gmail.com>
Sat, 15 Apr 2017 15:03:12 +0000 (09:03 -0600)
EAGE_Abstract/NMR_EAGE.tex

index 8301249..93395d2 100755 (executable)
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ and Benjamin R. Bloss, US Geological Survey}
 \section{Introduction}
 Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (sNMR) provides direct, non-invasive estimates of critical hydrologic physical properties \cite[]{BehroozmandEtAl2015}. This is possible because hydrogen atoms in water form a bulk magnetization $\left( \mathbf{M}_N^{(0)}\right)$ precessing about a static magnetic field $\left(\mathbf{B}_0\right)$ at the Larmor frequency $\left(f_L \equiv \omega_L / 2\pi \right)$, which is a function of static field intensity; for sNMR using the Earth's field $f_L \in(.9,2.6)~\mathrm{kHz}$. In the Earth's magnetic field, $\mathbf{M}_N^{(0)}$ is too small to be directly measured; however, it may be interacted with using wire loops on the ground surface which transmit magnetic fields $\left(\boldsymbol{\mathcal{B}}_T \left(\sigma\right) \right)$ oscillating at $f_L$ which tip the magnetization away from it's equilibrium state following the Bloch equations. Transmission of these magnetic fields is affected by the electrical conductivity $(\sigma)$ of the subsurface. After tipping, the initial amplitude of the signal is directly proportional to total porosity and the rate of signal decay can be related to the permeability of the media \cite[]{Kleinberg1994}. For these reasons, the method has become increasingly relied upon for near-surface characterization of groundwater systems  \cite[e.g.][]{Legchenko2004a,Nielsen2011}.  Additionally, sNMR been sucessfully applied in a variety of hydrologic conditions, beyond aquifer characterization to permafrost studies \cite[e.g.][]{parsekiangrosse13}, vadose zone investigations \cite[e.g.][]{costabel11}, and fractured aquifer studies \cite[e.g.][]{gev96}.  While the value of the method in extending aquifer pumping tests and characterizing new areas is clear, sNMR suffers greatly from low signal to noise and lengthy acquisition times.
 
-Most commonly in field surveys, the inductive transmitter and receiver pair are coincident.  While this has several advantages in terms of field deployment and signal interpretation, there are many alternative advantages to a compact, multi-turn receiver, for example as described by \cite{Behroozmand2016}.  We extend this idea to a roving, multicomponent receiver, of the same general concept as many three-component transient electromagnetic (TEM) receivers, similar to the concept of \cite{DavisEtAl2014}, though using inductive receivers.  This configuration provides distinct advantages over coincident loop receivers, including: increased signal to noise, improved resolution, the ability to target specific areas of the subsurface,  reduced dead time, and additional digital noise reduction procedures available.  Here, we provide motivation for the approach through the simulation of three-component receivers in a central loop sounding configuration and generation of both 1D and 3D kernels.  Associated field work and follow up analysis will include multiple positions relative to the transmitter loop to demonstrate the increased resolving power and signal to noise available through this technique.
+Most commonly in field surveys, the inductive transmitter and receiver pair are coincident.  While this has several advantages in terms of field deployment and signal interpretation, there are many alternative advantages to a compact, multi-turn receiver, for example as described by \cite{Behroozmand2016}.  We extend this idea to a roving, multicomponent receiver, of the same general concept as many three-component transient electromagnetic (TEM) receivers, similar to the concept of \cite{DavisEtAl2014} though here using inductive receivers.  This configuration provides distinct advantages over coincident loop receivers, including: increased signal to noise, improved resolution, the ability to target specific areas of the subsurface,  reduced dead time, and additional digital noise reduction procedures available.  Here, we provide motivation for the approach through the simulation of three-component receivers in a central loop sounding configuration and generation of both 1D and 3D kernels.  Associated field work and follow up analysis will include multiple positions relative to the transmitter loop to demonstrate the increased resolving power and signal to noise available through this technique.
 
 \section{Theory}
 We consider the standard on-resonance pulses and subsequent free induction decay in this paper; however our results can be extended to other pulse sequences as the loop and spin coupling will be the same. For an inductive coil sensor $i$, the sNMR measurement results in the observation of an induced voltage $\left( \mathcal{V}_N^{(i)} \right)$ which is a function of pulse moment $q= I_p \tau_p$; where $I_p$ is the tipping pulse peak current and $\tau_p$ is the duration of the pulse. The measured voltage can be formulated in terms of an imaging kernel $\left( \mathcal{K}_0^{(i)} \right)$ which is sensitive to the NMR-detectable water model $\left(f_p\right)$ fractionated into decay bins \cite[]{Weichman2000,Hertrich2005,Mueller-Petke2010}
@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ In \eqref{eq:kern}, $\chi_N$ is the nuclear susceptibility, $\theta_T$ is the ti
 \cite{Behroozmand2016} imposed the constraint that the receiver loops should use the same total length of wire as the transmitter loop. Here, we present receiver loops with the same effective area as the transmitter loops. While this requires a much greater length of wire, the gauge of the wire can be quite small such that the total mass of filament necessary is not excessive. Both the noise and signal will scale directly with the number of turns of the receiver loop (in sNMR cultural noise $\gg$ Johnson noise), meaning that there are diminishing returns to increased loop windings. Additionally, the increased inductance of the loop will change the frequency response of the receiver--which we do not consider in this analysis. As such, the ideal number of turns probably lies within these two endpoints. However, simulating receivers with the same effective area as the transmitter allows for more direct comparison with the DOI and characteristics of compact receivers in relation to coincident ones. Field work will likely involve fewer turns on the receiver coils, but may include preamp gain.  
 
 \section{Simulation}
-We simulate the sNMR response for an earth with a conductivity structure as follows: the top layer is 10 metres thick and 50 $\Omega\cdot\mathrm{m}$ and a second infinite thickness layer is 100 $\Omega\cdot\mathrm{m}$. Thirty-six pulse moments were simulated whose current varied in an exponential fashion from roughly 400 to 8 Amps, $\tau_p$ was 20 ms. $\mathbf{B}_0$ had a 67$^\circ$ inclination 0$^\circ$ declination and an intensity of 52,750 nT, corresponding to a Larmor frequency of 2,245 Hz. The transmitter loop was 100m $\times$ 100m with edges aligned with and perpendicular to magnetic north. Receivers were 1m $\times$ 1m wound 10 000 times so that they had the same effective area as the transmitter, aligned in the three principal directions.   
+We simulate the sNMR response for an earth with a conductivity structure as follows: the top layer is 10 metres thick and 50 $\Omega\cdot\mathrm{m}$ and a second infinite thickness layer is 100 $\Omega\cdot\mathrm{m}$. Thirty-six pulse moments were simulated whose current varied in an exponential fashion from roughly 400 to 8 Amps, with $\tau_p$ of 20 ms. $\mathbf{B}_0$ had a 67$^\circ$ inclination 0$^\circ$ declination and an intensity of 52,750 nT, corresponding to a Larmor frequency of 2,245 Hz. The transmitter loop was 100m $\times$ 100m with edges aligned with and perpendicular to magnetic north. Receivers were 1m $\times$ 1m wound 10 000 times so that they had the same effective area as the transmitter, aligned in the three principal directions.   
 
 \begin{figure}
     \begin{center}
@@ -79,14 +79,13 @@ We simulate the sNMR response for an earth with a conductivity structure as foll
 
 \section{Results}
 
-Figure \ref{fig:Kerns} shows the simulated imaging kernels comparing a compact, three-component receiver in the centre of the transmitter loop (top three panels) with a standard, coincident Tx/Rx loop setup (bottom panel).  For each of the components, the real and imaginary parts of the kernels are shown as a function of depth (vertical axis) and pulse moment (horizontal axis).  It is immediately apparent that there are significant differences in depth sensitivity between the compact and coincident receivers.  While the coincident loop has a broad depth sensitivity that slowly changes as a function of pulse moment, the compact receiver shows a sharper vertical dependence in the $z$ component, consistent with \cite{Behroozmand2016}.  However, significant sensitivity is provided by the $y$ component as well, the real part having similar magnitudes to the $z$ component. 
+Figure \ref{fig:Kerns} shows the simulated imaging kernels comparing a compact, three-component receiver in the centre of the transmitter loop (top three panels) with a standard, coincident Tx/Rx loop setup (bottom panel).  For each of the components, the real and imaginary parts of the kernels are shown as a function of depth (vertical axis) and pulse moment (horizontal axis).  It is immediately apparent that there are significant differences in depth sensitivity between the compact and coincident receivers.  While the coincident loop has a broad depth sensitivity that slowly changes as a function of pulse moment, the compact receiver shows a sharper vertical dependence in the $z$ component, consistent with \cite{Behroozmand2016}.  However, significant sensitivity is provided by the $y$ component as well, the real part having similar magnitudes to the $z$ component.  The three components provide increased sensitivity and resolution as each of the components provides a different spatial distribution. 
 
 Decoupling the transmitter and receiver also allows the receiver to move freely with respect to the trasmitter loop.  Figure \ref{fig:RxSens} shows the lateral variation in the imaging kernel in the $x$ component for a single pulse moment, demonstrating the spatial sensitivity to a moving receiver.
 
 \section{Conclusions}
-We have shown that a three-component compact receiver can improve depth sensitivity in surface nuclear magnetic resonance when used in a centre-loop sounding configuration.  Additionally, allowing the receiver to be decoupled from the transmitter loop permits movement of the coil to spatially sample the survey area.  This is the first step in generating a three-dimensional NMR imaging kernel for a well-posed numerical inversion.
-
-Aligning a component with the background magnetic field may prove to be a useful noise cancelling tool in certain environments.  Additionally, the multi-channel nature of the measurement coupled with spatially distributed measurements allows for a greater variety of digital signal processing techniques to be applied.  
+We have shown that a three-component compact receiver can improve depth sensitivity in surface nuclear magnetic resonance when used in a centre-loop sounding configuration.  Allowing the receiver to be decoupled from the transmitter loop permits movement of the coil to spatially sample the survey area--this is the first step in generating a three-dimensional NMR imaging kernel for a well-posed numerical inversion.  Finally, aligning a component with the background field may prove to be a useful noise cancelling tool in certain environments.
 
 %\section{Acknowledgements}
 %We acknowledge use of University of Utah Center for High Performance Computing resources.